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Dr.Padela recently got published in the Chest. The manuscript uses a clinical case to work through Muslim controversies over brain death and withdrawing life support Here is the link
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Latest News
Dr.Padela recently got published in the Chest. The manuscript uses a clinical case to work through Muslim controversies over brain death and withdrawing life support Here is the link
The recording for our Live Webinar on "Advancing equity for Muslim physicians in the healthcare workforce" and the policy report that stems from our research is available now at : click here
Initiative on Islam and Medicine

Introduction to the Field of Islamic Bioethics

This self-paced, intensive course introduces learners to :

Critical concepts in Islamic theology and law that undergird normative ethical frameworks.
Scholarly discussions regarding the methods, content and scope of an Islamic bioethics.
Extant normative rulings and discursive products of applied Islamic bioethics related to end-of-life care, organ donation, and reproductive health.

16 weeks

2–4 hours per week

Self-paced

Progress at your own speed

Physician
Price: $300 | $150

Non Physician
Price: $150 | $75

5/5

4.9

35,044 ratings

98%
4,187,116 already enrolled

This course will be available in January 2023

About this Course

An Introduction to the field of Islamic Bioethics

Islamic bioethics, as a subject of scholarly inquiry and as a repository of guidance, remains a field-in-formation for its content, scope and methodology are subject to debate. Ambiguities regarding the contours of an Islamic bioethics do not stem from the lack of a moral theology outlined by scripture, nor from a dearth of ethico-legal judgments about biomedicine formulated by Islamic jurists. Rather, the contemporary challenge is to devise bioethical frameworks that are both rooted in Islamic theology and law, yet are fully informed, and thus practically address, the needs of patients, clinicians, religious advisors, and policymakers.

The challenges for “Islamic” bioethics are made more profound by the fact that notions about moral norms, the good, and the ethical are scattered across different Islamic sciences including moral theology (uṣūl al-fiqh), scholastic theology (ʿilm al-kalām), jurisprudence and law (fiqh), as well as within various genres and practices related to moral formation and spiritual development (taṣawwuf and adab). The multidisciplinary nature of bioethical inquiry also leads to a crisis of epistemology and legitimacy; it is not clear how much weight should be accorded to the reality on the ground (what is) when considering the moral ordering of society (what should be) as well as which register of contemporary bioethical discourse (clinical, political, societal) Islamic bioethics should attend to.

Consequently, this self-paced, intensive course introduces learners to
(i) critical concepts in Islamic theology and law that undergird normative ethical frameworks,
(ii) scholarly discussions regarding the methods, content and scope of an Islamic bioethics, and
(iii) extant normative rulings and discursive products of applied Islamic bioethics related to end-of-life care, organ donation, and reproductive health.

Learning objectives

At a glance

Institution: Initiative on Islam and Medicine

Subject: Introduction to field of Islamic bioethics

Level: Introductory

Prerequisites: None (This is an introductory course)

Language: English

Language: English

What you'll learn

Module 1: Introduction and Course Overview.
Module 2: Research Methods outputs & producers' role in Islamic Bioethics.
Module 3: Introduction to Islamic Moral epistemology.
Module 4: Islamic Law & Bioethics.
Module 5 Character Development & Islamic Bioethics.
Module 6: Contestations over stakeholders' role in Islamic bioethical discourse.
Module 7: Islamic Bioethics of Brain Death & End-of-Life Healthcare Ethics.
Module 8: Islamic Bioethics of Organs Donation and Transplantation.
Module 9: Islamic Bioethics of Abortion & Human Reproduction.
Module 10: Islamic Bioethics Review.

Who this course is for

Learner Career Outcomes

15%

Started a new career after completing these courses

20%

Got a tangible career benefit from this course

Self paced

Progress through the course at your own pace within the 4 month cohort

Shareable Certificate

Earn a Certificate upon completion

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.

Instructor

Aasim I. Padela, MD, MSc, FACEP
Chairperson and Director of Initiative on Islam and Medicine

Dr. Padela is an emergency medicine clinician, community health researcher, and bioethicist whose scholarship aims at improving health and healthcare equity by better accommodating religious values in healthcare delivery. Using Muslim Americans and Islam as a model, he studies how (i) religion impacts patient health behaviors and healthcare experiences, (ii) informs the professional identities and workplace experiences of clinicians, and (iii) furnishes bioethical guidance to patients, providers, policy-makers, and religious leaders. This knowledge is subsequently mobilized towards educational and policy interventions. Methodologically Dr.Padela’s expertise spans community-engaged research, religiously-tailored & faith-based message design, educational interventions aimed at health behavior change, discourse analysis, and mixed-methods research. His current projects span behaviors related to cancer screening, organ donation, end-of-life care, and the intersection of religion and science and are funded by the John Templeton Foundation, the Health Research and Services Administration, the Greenwall Foundation, and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College and an MSc in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. He completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, clinical medical ethics training at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. He also holds Bachelor’s degrees in Biomedical Engineering and Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, and has studied Islamic theology and law in seminary and academic settings. He has authored over 120 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, is editor of three books, and serves in an editorial capacity for the Encyclopedia of Islamic Bioethics, the American Journal of Bioethics, BMC Medical Ethics, Global Bioethics, International Journal of Islam, BETIM Journal of Medical Humanities, and TAFHIM Journal of Islam and the Contemporary World. His work has been featured in many major news outlets including the New York Times, USA Today, the Chicago Tribune,Washington Post, National Public Radio, BBC, and CNN.

Self paced

Progress through the course at your own pace within the 4 month cohort

Shareable Certificate

Earn a Certificate upon completion

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.

Dr Rafaqat Rashid

Co-Founder : Al-Balagh Academy UK

Imam Musha Azam

Director of Development : SoundVision Foundation

Sadaf Popal

Student Intern

ADEL SYED

CEO : UMMA Community Clinic

Dr. Obadah Ghannam

Academic Clinical Fellow in Genral Practice,University of Birmingham, Trustee, Center for Islam and Medicine

Flexible deadlines

Reset deadlines in accordance to your schedule.

Self paced

Progress through the course at your own pace within the 4 month cohort

Shareable Certificate

Earn a Certificate upon completion

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.

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January - April 2023

(Physician) 50% off $300 $150
(Non Physician) 50% off $150 $75

May - August 2023

Physician $300
(Non Physician) $150

September - December 2023

Physician $300
(Non Physician) $150

Mufti Nazim Khutbah

Padela Khutbah

Shkifah Khutbah

Intervention Study

Qualitative Study and Interviews

Fifty Muslim multiethnicity women (40 years old and above) were interviewed (6 focused group) and 19 in individual interviews. We found religious beliefs did informed mammography intention, which includes (1) the perceived religious duty to care for one’s health, (2) religious practices as methods of disease prevention, (3) fatalistic notions about health, and (4) comfort with gender concordant health care.

Quantitative Study and survey

240, 40 years of age or older, were surveyed (72 respondents were Arab, 71 South Asian, 59 African American, and 38 from another ethnicity). We found that positive religious coping and perceived religious discrimination in health settings significantly (negatively) affected mammogram adherence among Muslim women in Chicago.

American Cancer Society mammogram recommendations

Mammogram recommendation for women at average risk or breast cancer

  • Women between 40 and 44 have a choice to have a mammography every year.
  • Women 45 to 54 should get mammograms every year.
  • Women 55 and older can switch to a mammogram every other year, or they can choose to continue yearly mammograms.

3R model

Reframing “switch train tracks”
  • Keep the barriers belief intact but change the way one thinks about it so it is consonant with the desired health behavior
  • Normalizes the barrier belief
Reprioritize: “show them a better train”
  • Introduce a new belief and create higher valence for it than the barrier belief
  • Normalization of the barrier belief is optional
Reform: “breakdown the train carriage”
  • Negate the barrier belief by demonstrating its faults by appealing to authority structures

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